630-355-7776." /> Child Support

Call Today for Your FREE Consultation

630-355-7776

650 Diehl Road, Suite 117, Naperville, IL 60563

Bolingbrook Child Support LawyerChild support payments help unmarried and divorced parents share child-related costs. In Illinois, child support is usually calculated using the Income Shares formula. Each parent’s net income is factored into the formula so that the amount of child support is reasonably affordable and allows the child the same standard of living as he or she would experience if the parents were married. Unfortunately, calculating child support is not always this straightforward. Unusual income sources, unemployment, financial deception, and other issues can complicate child support calculations significantly.

What Counts as Income?

The amount of child support a parent pays is based on a carefully designed formula that uses each parent’s net income. Net income includes not only wages, but all other forms of income as well. Bonuses, commissions, self-employment income, income from rental properties, investment income, pensions, Social Security, inheritance, and even personal injury settlements or workers’ compensation awards may count as income. Net income excludes taxes and child support or spousal support orders from a previous relationship.  

What if a Parent Lies About Their Income?

Unfortunately, some parents are less than forthcoming about finances during a divorce or child support proceeding. If your spouse is not disclosing all income sources, contact a family law attorney for help. Child support payments should always be based on the most up-to-date, accurate financial information.

...

Plainfield Divorce LawyerStay-at-home moms and dads who get divorced face a unique set of circumstances. For many parents, the justification for staying home with the kids was largely based on the other spouse’s income. If you are a parent who has sacrificed a career to care for your children full-time, you may be worried about the financial implications of divorce. You may also worry about how you and your children will adjust to life after the separation. There is no getting around it: Divorce as a stay-at-home parent is complicated and emotionally taxing. Fortunately, Illinois law provides options that may help.

Temporary Relief Orders Can Provide Financial Support and Stability

Unfortunately, many stay-at-home parents stay in unhappy or even abusive marriages because of concerns about money. If a parent has not held a job in several years, they may worry about having the financial means to leave their spouse. If you are in this situation, you should know that you may be able to get financial assistance from the other spouse through a temporary relief order.

Divorce cases may take months or even years to resolve. Fortunately, you do not have to wait until the divorce is complete to get child support or spousal support. You can petition the court for a temporary relief order which will require your spouse to pay child support and/or spousal support. The court will consider both spouses’ financial resources, the standard of living during the marriage, and the children's needs when deciding on a child support or spousal support temporary relief order.

...

Bolingbrook Family Law AttorneyOriginally Posted April 13, 2020 ---- Updated Post November 11, 2021

Any parent can confirm that raising children is expensive -- especially when you are doing so on a single income. If you are divorced or soon will be, it is important to know how Illinois child support laws will apply to your case. Well-meaning friends or relatives may try to give you advice about child support or help you estimate your payments. However, the way that Illinois calculates child support changed significantly in recent years. The best way to receive trustworthy guidance regarding child support is to work with an experienced family law attorney. 

Illinois no longer bases child support on only the paying spouse’s income and the number of children to be supported. Now, both parents’ incomes determine child support payments.

...

Will County Child Support AttorneysDisabilities come in all forms. Some disabilities, such as cerebral palsy or spina bifida, are often immediately apparent. Other disabilities, like autism, are invisible to a casual observer. Whatever the specific disability, having a disabled child can be extremely challenging for parents. Many disabled children require specialized medical care, education, and assistive devices. Parents may also need to forgo working outside of the home to care for a disabled child. This can lead to significant financial stress. For unmarried or divorced parents, child support payments can help cover these costs. However, what happens when a disabled child becomes an adult?  

Continuing Child Support After Adulthood

Child support typically ends once a child reaches adulthood and/or completes an undergraduate degree. At this point, the child is expected to provide for his or her own needs. However, a disabled child may be unable to reach the same level of financial independence as a child without a disability. Fortunately, Illinois law reflects this reality. Parents with disabled children may be able to receive non-minor support or child support that continues past childhood.

Financial Support for a Disabled Child

As a parent of a disabled child, you may wonder what types of disabilities qualify a child for non-minor support. Illinois law defines “disability” as a physical or mental impairment that significantly limits a major life activity. Physical disabilities, intellectual disabilities, developmental disabilities, and mental health conditions may qualify a child for continued support from the other parent.

...

Plainfield Child Support AttorneyOriginally published: May 11, 2020 -- Updated: August 25, 2021

UPDATE: Parents who have experienced financial issues that have affected their ability to pay child support will want to take the correct steps to avoid the issues described below. This has been a major concern for many parents during the COVID-19 pandemic, and those who have lost their jobs or who have experienced health issues that have affected the income they are able to earn will want to make sure they take the proper measures to avoid penalties for failing to meet their financial obligations.

Family courts will often recognize financial hardship experienced by parents, but unless a parent takes action to inform the court of these issues, they will be required to follow the terms of their child support order. This means they must continue making monthly payments, and in addition to making up any missed payments, they may also be required to pay interest on these past-due amounts. To avoid these issues, a parent can file a petition for a modification of their child support obligations as soon as they have experienced financial issues that affect their ability to pay. While the court may not immediately grant a request for modification, any modifications that are made may be retroactive to the date the modification request was filed. 

...
avvo mh three lod isba cba aba acr dcba wcba
Back to Top